The Voice of Sacred Hearts Academy

Ka Leo

Features

A beginner’s field guide to coffee

A beginner’s field guide to coffee

Celine Isabelle Arnobit, Reporter, Features Editor

The myriad of coffee options one encounters upon walking into a local coffe...

April 21, 2017No Comments

A Cold Coffee Competition

A Cold Coffee Competition

Taylor McKenzie, Reporter, Media Editor

The coffee culture, as we know it, is changing. Instead of rushing to Starb...

April 21, 2017No Comments

Making Haku Lei For May Day

Making Haku Lei For May Day

Kekaimalie Woods, Reporter

In celebration of May Day, Sacred Hearts Academy students will learn how...

April 21, 2017No Comments

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Opinions

Waste In Paradise

Waste In Paradise

Taylor McKenzie, Reporter, Media Editor

We live in Paradise. It’s something we’re told from the endless days of summer th...

April 24, 2017No Comments

Oahu’s two-year-old plastic bag ban: Is it working?

Oahu’s two-year-old plastic bag ban: Is it working?

Celine Isabelle Arnobit, Reporter, Feature Editor

On July 1, 2015, Hawaii became the first state to issue a ban on plastic...

March 28, 2017No Comments

General etiquette necessary for youth

General etiquette necessary for youth

Celine Isabelle Arnobit, Reporter, Features Editor

Some consider teenagers and young people to be among one of the more dis...

March 1, 2017No Comments

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Blog

Exploring vineyards in Napa Valley

Exploring vineyards in Napa Valley

Noe Nekotani, Reporter

During spring break, my family and I visited San Francisco. In addition to the shopping and countless street performers, exploring the vineyards of Napa Valley would have to be the highlight of the trip. I say this as a minor, however, so I’m sure my experience was different from that of my parents and older sister, who spent much of the time sampling wines. Lets just say the food and sights were amazing; the juice box and animal crackers handed to me--a bit comical, well, at least my family thought so. Sterling Vineyards was the first vineyard we visited. Perched 300 feet above the town of Calistoga, Sterling Vineyards offers panoramic views of Napa Valley. For me, my visit there was a bit odd since this is where I received a juice box and animal crackers. My family wouldn’t let me live that down. To get to the winery, we rode an aerial tram up into the hills. It was a little scary because we noticed the car dipped when my father entered. Apparently the maximum capacity of each car was four people; not sure of the maximum weight, but we were panicked for most of the trip, as we rode lopsided and cringing. Once that nightmare of a ride was over, we arrived to a long set of stairs. After finally arriving at the top, we were greeted by staff who ushered us to a small table. At the time, the weather had been below 60 degrees, but my sister still insisted on sitting outside for the “view.” Although the service was fast, we didn’t have much to do besides look at the surrounding foliage and laugh at my father's attempt to swirl his glass of wine, a technique for blending the flavors before consuming. They also laughed at me, as I was subjected to constant humiliation every time I sipped from my juice box. Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by how family-friendly the Napa Valley experience had been. Although we had visited four other vineyards, Sterling was definitely my favorite.

April 19, 2017No Comments

Sakura in Japan

Sakura in Japan

March 30, 2017

This spring break, I visited Japan with the Sacred Hearts Academy band. It was not only an opportunity to bond with my classmates, but it was also my first time leaving the country. Perhaps the most notable difference in leaving the U.S. was found within my body’s internal clock. As we crossed over the International Date Line and stepped off of the airplane, I could feel that my body was still stuck on Hawaii time, which is 19 hours behind Japan. The same could be said for the rest of the group, which included about 39 students from the Intermediate Band and Wind Ensemble. Despite this, we were still excited to explore a new country and obtain a higher musical understanding through the Osaka Orchestra. Throughout the trip, I was grouped with my friends Sally and Olivia; it was lucky for me, too, because they were able to hold steady conversations in Japanese. Thus, serving as interpreters, in most cases; although, I still found myself relying on some childhood knowledge of the culture. I could pick up bits and pieces of the language--from when grandma used to yell at me or when mom would try to teach me. Not to mention, I had superb chopstick-using skills. I’ll admit, though, the first night in Tokyo was the scariest because I was insecure about my non-existing Japanese-speaking skills. The tour guides led us to an area in Ikebukuro, near our hotel, to find dinner and do some shopping. The street was lit up, and the song “How Far I’ll Go” from Disney’s “Moana” was playing in Japanese. At first, I was too afraid to find a place to eat dinner because I didn’t know if I would be able to communicate. Luckily, we ended up at a nice restaurant that was popular among the locals. We managed to eat dinner and pay without any trouble. Falling asleep was no problem, but it was difficult for us to stay asleep. On the second day, we were already up at 4 a.m., which would be about 9 a.m. in Hawaii.  When we first got to Japan, the tour guide advised us to sleep as much as we could in order to get used to Japan time. We tried our best, but were kept awake with excitement knowing that we would soon be visiting Tokyo Disneyland. At Tokyo Disneyland and DisneySea, special popcorn buckets are sold for their unique collectible character designs. There was no specification as to where one can find the different characters, so we ended up spending a prolonged amount of time trying to find the special Stitch bucket. We couldn’t find it, but another student did.   Owakudani, our next location, is mostly famous for kuro-tamago, or black eggs. The eggs have a black-colored shell from being boiled in a sulfur hot spring. It is said that if one eats an egg, the person will get seven years added to his life. Although I’m not a fan of boiled eggs, and typically avoid eating the yolk, I forced myself to eat the black egg in its entirety. My face twisted with disgust, from the taste of the yolk, but I chewed and swallowed every last bit. I was determined to get those seven years tacked onto my lifespan! Visiting Hiroshima was the most memorable part of the trip for me. I am one-fourth Japanese, and during this trip, I learned that my family originated from Hiroshima. As soon as we arrived, we went to a restaurant where we ate okonomiyaki, which is a savory Japanese pancake. In Hiroshima, the okonomiyaki is layered with ingredients, while Osaka style mixes everything together. At the Hiroshima Peace Memorial, we performed a special ceremony while offering the one-thousand paper cranes we made before the trip. We were all warned that the memorial would make us very emotional; I, personally, didn’t take the warning seriously, but by the end of the museum visit, I found myself shedding a few tears. The museum housed student uniforms, building corners where people were possibly sitting during the bombing and many other artifacts. Being in Hiroshima and knowing that this was the same place as the actual bombings, hit me hard. I can’t imagine what I’d do if anything half as blood-curdling happened to my friends or family. The end of the trip came as soon as it started. I miss my roommates the most, as well as my friends. But I think just being in Japan and exploring a new place is something I will never forget.

So You Want To Tour A College

So You Want To Tour A College

March 28, 2017

It’s almost that time of year again. No, it’s not Christmas nor is it birthday season but rather, the bane of all incoming seniors: it’s time to apply to colleges. Throughout high school, students are bombarded with reminders about college and told which classes to take and which extracurriculars to sign up for. And at every family event, they’re asked for a hit list of colleges they’ve applied to. But this all pales in comparison to what senior year promises. It is the widespread recommendation of both counselors and colleges alike that prospective students tour the college of their choice. The idea of visiting the place you might spend thousands of dollars on and years of your life at can seem daunting. While shivering in 40-degree weather, I was similarly intimidated by the task of uncovering the “perfect” college over spring break. I visited several different universities on the west coast, including the University of Portland, the University of Seattle, the University of Washington and the University of British Columbia. Here is a collection of tips that helped me during these two-hour tours, trekking through the campuses in chilly spring weather.   1. Ask Questions. I know, this suggestion is overused and falling upon deaf ears. I’ve been there; you don’t want to ask your college tour guide questions that may have unsatisfactory answers. But who else are you going to ask? Tour guides are usually the best people to turn to when you want the honest truth. Plus, they are happy to share personal experiences that hours of research can’t provide.   2. Stop and Smell the Roses. College tours are an excellent way to understand the school’s culture. Every school will feel and act differently. Likewise, not every school will feel right to you. Not only will every school have its own atmosphere, so will every dorm. The best way to see if you’re compatible with the school’s personality is to visit the different dorms and meet the people who live there.   3. Find Your Interests. Your tour will most likely not include a visit to the areas you want to study. Take a detour and explore the campus by yourself. Introduce yourselves to the advisors or teachers of the classes or programs you are planning to join. They would be happy to answer your questions and provide an insight into their area of expertise.   4. Eat Up! Try the food at the college campus eateries. You are going to be spending a large amount of your time eating on campus, so why not give your taste buds a head start? And, if you’re someone who thinks with your stomach rather than with your head, then this may be the perfect opportunity to decide if a school is right for you.  If you happen to visit the University of Seattle, they offer free meal passes to students who go on their tours.   5. Amenities? Campus tours almost always include a look into a dorm room used by college students. Some colleges, including the University of Seattle, provide every room with a microwave and a mini fridge. Other colleges, like the University of Portland, offer large communal kitchens for student use.   If you are unable to visit the colleges of your dreams, then don’t fret! Many colleges offer virtual tours, which are almost like the real thing, minus the frigid temperatures or 800-mile road trips. Virtual tours are also especially useful when researching foreign colleges, which are a little more difficult to visit. Don’t be afraid to reach out to the school’s advisors to learn about any extra requirements your school of interest might have for international students. Many colleges, including the University of British Columbia, have large international presences and offer special programs to help these students transition. Most importantly, we need to take a long breath and enjoy our last year of high school. While that phrase may seem like an oxymoron, it is (probably) possible. Good luck and happy college hunting!

Valentines’ Day Twist

Valentines’ Day Twist

March 22, 2017

Seeing Valentine’s Day differently (and with a dash of Tom Felton sugar) I was getting some sugar tonight. But not just any sugar; nor the kind of sugar that’s swirled into sweet, decadent dark chocolate or the kind baked into pink cookies and pastries. I was getting actual sugar–in a jar, and it had actor Tom Felton’s face on it.  And yes; I told the “Harry Potter” star about this little act of mine through Twitter. I didn’t get a reply back, though. It’s a quirky idea, I know. But being a former “closet Potterhead,” as most “Harry Potter” fans call themselves, and proud Slytherin (with Gryffindor tendencies), I thought Valentine’s Day was the best day to “come out” of this denial. Despite the strange looks I received from my passing peers, I was quite happy–which is a feeling I don’t often experience on Valentine’s Day. For a long time, I’ve felt indifferent toward Feb. 14, and it’s not because I don’t have a significant other. It’s because I never understood why it was only on Valentine’s that love and affection are publicly displayed. Then again, this comes from someone who is not as open with their feelings as others may be; I suppose I’m more private, in that respect. It would be a lie if I said that I never felt lonely on Valentine’s Day. I mean, when you’re surrounded by couples and you’re the only one standing by yourself, it gets to you. As much as I enjoy my solitude, it would be nice to have someone with whom to spend the day. This year, however, I wanted to change my perspective a bit. With less than four months left in my high school career, I felt the need to do something different. I was hoping it would be a way to view something from a new angle. This is where I had the idea. Why not turn my indifference into something else, something that communicates my appreciation for people, especially for those who may not get any Valentine’s Day love from a significant other? Thus came forth my 2017 V-Day Mission: “Operation: Happy Punny-Tine’s Day.” I am a sucker for puns; they always make me smile, no matter how silly. I also enjoy making my friends and family happy; to me, if I contribute positively to someone’s life, in any way or form, I am doing my job. I want to make an impact. I want to leave an impression on people so that I will not be forgotten. On Feb. 13, I printed about 20 photos of food puns and cheesy pick-up lines and woke up the next day with the Tom Felton Sugar Jar in hand, determined to change someone’s day for the better. And change the day, I did. But the effect was much stronger than I had thought it would be.  The effects of my little mission began to be made apparent to me once my homeroom teacher burst out laughing. I showed her that I brought Tom to school with me. She thought it was hysterical, especially being a fan of “Harry Potter” herself. Already, I had made someone laugh, even if it was at me. The littlest things can make a day better or worse, and I think I positively kickstarted her day by sharing something that I thought was interesting. I hadn’t even given her a pun or pick-up line yet! As Tom received confused and amused looks by passing students, I garnered smiles and hugs from the teachers and peers to whom I dealt out puns. Every grin or laugh I saw or heard improved my mood; I was making an unexpected change in their day and by the brightened countenances I observed, it was a change for the good. I was even put on Snapchat! Besides being elated that my random acts of passing out puns were making people happy, I LOVED that I wasn’t the only one the Tom Sugar Jar was getting love from. By the end of the day, with all my puns and pick-up lines tucked away into pockets and stapled onto bulletin boards in some teachers’ rooms, I felt something in my chest stir. For once in a very long time, I was content on Valentine’s Day. I had made people smile and laugh, and most of all, felt appreciated and loved, even if I had only given them pieces of paper with pretty art and quirky phrases on it.   To celebrate, I stopped by the Kona Ice Truck that was on campus for GALentine’s Day. Of course, I brought Tom along, even if he couldn’t enjoy the icy treat the same way that I could.  I like to think “Operation Happy Punny-Tine’s Day” was a success, despite its silly premise. Through this endeavor of mine, I was reminded that giving love is not something that is only reserved for Feb. 14; you don’t necessarily need a significant other to be happy. There’s love and gratitude all around and within us, even if it doesn’t seem so. It’s just a matter of going that extra mile to show and experience it.  

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Entertainment

A ‘Tale as Old as Time’–with CGI!

A ‘Tale as Old as Time’–with CGI!

Kailanianna Ablog, Reporter, Opinions Editor

Disney’s live-action version of “Beauty and the Beast,” starring Emma Watson and Dan Stevens, ha...

April 24, 2017No Comments

Highlights of 2017 HIFF Spring Showcase

Highlights of 2017 HIFF Spring Showcase

April 24, 2017

The Hawaii International Film Festival (HIFF) kicked off spring with its ...

Excitement for Every Day6

Excitement for Every Day6

April 24, 2017

South Korean rock band Day6 have fans excited for the ...

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The Voice of Sacred Hearts Academy
The Voice of Sacred Hearts Academy