Heart disease known to be more harmful to women than men

The+Freshman+Division+sponsored+activities+during+Freshman+Week+in+February+to+raise+awareness+of+heart+disease%2C+the+leading+killer+of+women.+
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Heart disease known to be more harmful to women than men

The Freshman Division sponsored activities during Freshman Week in February to raise awareness of heart disease, the leading killer of women.

The Freshman Division sponsored activities during Freshman Week in February to raise awareness of heart disease, the leading killer of women.

Giselle

The Freshman Division sponsored activities during Freshman Week in February to raise awareness of heart disease, the leading killer of women.

Giselle

Giselle

The Freshman Division sponsored activities during Freshman Week in February to raise awareness of heart disease, the leading killer of women.

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According to the American Heart Association, heart disease is the number one killer of women.

One woman dies every four minutes of heart disease. It is the deadliest illness for women. The month of February is heart disease awareness month.

The American Heart Association’s Go Red for Women supports heart disease research and women’s heart health.

During the week of Valentine’s Day, the Freshman Council held several events that brought awareness of heart disease to the student body.

Council member, Ellie Ramirez, said, “Our goal in supporting ‘Go Red for Women’ is to make everyone aware of the prevalence of heart disease in women. We want to inform students about how serious this disease is and how they can prevent it from happening to them or their loved ones.”

Women’s heart attack symptoms are different than those of men. Men’s symptoms of a heart attack include chest pain, chest discomfort and chest pressure.

Women’s symptoms include cold sweat, pain in the arm(s), back, neck or jaw, stomach pain, shortness of breath, nausea, lightheadedness, sweating and fatigue.

“These days women are so busy with other things that sometimes they forget about being healthy,” said adviser Cleo Eubanks. “The student council held several activites such as door decorations and healthy snacks to help students become aware about heart disease. It also allowed them to reflect on how to live healthy.”